Welcome!

Cloud Security Authors: Yeshim Deniz, Liz McMillan, Elizabeth White, Pat Romanski, Zakia Bouachraoui

Related Topics: Cloud Security

Cloud Security: Blog Post

Snowden Gone, Ripples Remain!

Essentially, these government programs are creating nervous times for my Canadian, European and APAC customers

[Original version of this blog appeared on PandoDaily magazine.]

Though Snowden is long gone now, the ripple effects that he created are going to remain for a long time to come. If you haven’t done so already, I suggest you read about the NSA surveillance programs PRISM and XKeyscoe before you continue with this article.

Essentially, these government programs are creating nervous times for my Canadian, European and APAC customers who are using US cloud providers. Given the very strict data residency and data privacy requirements to protect their citizens’ sensitive data in these parts of the world, through “guilt by association” alone, the latest incidents have implicated most corporations that move their data across boundaries. One thing is certain: these programs that are exposed because someone came out in the public. Just because a specific country’s cloud provider hasn’t been accused yet (or not found guilty) doesn’t necessarily mean that they are not doing the same thing. There is a chance that they might be doing it and have not been caught yet.

Unfortunately, the cloud community spent years alleviating the fear of moving data to the cloud by entities. Those days, the fear was about hackers and disgruntled employees/partners accidentally or willfully exposing their data. Now they need to fight an uphill battle of convincing the entities not about hackers, but about legal entities and governments.

Foreign governments are magnifying these concerns even further. Here is some classic news from Germany about setting policies and sanctioning US firms. (http://www.industryweek.com/public-policy/germany-demands-sanctions-us-firms-over-privacy-0). Though the intent might be good, the goals and net effect of such actions might be dubious at best. The cost associated with sanctioning cloud providers coupled with damage to the brands’ reputations is far greater than any benefit that might be derived from the compensation obtained.

There are reports suggesting that US cloud computing industry could lose as much as $35 billion over the next three years. (http://www.itif.org/publications/how-much-will-prism-cost-us-cloud-computing-industry.) A recent CSA survey provides an early indication of this (https://cloudsecurityalliance.org/download/government-access-to-information-survey-results/).About half of the surveys non-US respondents say they are going to move away from US clouds. But where would they go? And how can they ensure that they would be moving to is better and not from the proverbial “frying pan to the fire”?

For foreign entities, such as European corporations, choosing a cloud provider in the US can rank high on their preferred list. This is because there is a higher number of cloud providers in USA, who provide very mature solutions with very competitive pricing.  Until now, all you had to worry about was the data residency (or privacy) issue, but recent events have led everyone to worry about whether a US government agency is covertly inspecting their data.

Looking for a viable solution?  Don’t send sensitive data to the cloud. Send either encrypted garble or tokens that look like the original data.

When you encrypt the data before it leaves your perimeter, you control the fate of your data. You get to choose the encryption key, the specific algorithm, and key management. This means that you get to control “who gets to see what, when and how much.” This is really important. If anyone needs to see your sensitive information, they have to come to you rather than going to your data sitter. You control the “keys to your kingdom.”

The second option that is gaining momentum recently is “Tokenization” (or Tokenisation as it is known everywhere else). In this case you take the original sensitive data out, store it in a secure vault, and replace it with a random token that looks, feels, and acts like original data. The premise of tokenization is that “what is not there cannot be stolen.” Let hackers and governments have fun with it without knowing they have fake data.

This is where solutions such as Intel Tokenization Broker (ETB) can help. It intercepts any message that goes out, in any enterprise messaging format (structured or unstructured data), and scans for the sensitive data that is in the message, removes the sensitive data (such as credit card, personal info, health records, financial records, etc.), stores them in a safe place, and replaces them with random data that is formatted exactly as the original data. The only entity that can correlate the token to the original is you and no one else.

The solution is “touchless.” This means you don’t have to touch or modify any of your existing applications. You drop these tokenization/data protection gateways in the line of traffic, regardless of the type of traffic or type of message/data, and it will automagically sense the data based on pre-defined policies and work its magic.

Caveat Emptor: You still have to be ready when the government agency comes knocking on your door asking for this information!

The post Snowden gone, ripples remain! appeared first on Application Security.

Read the original blog entry...

More Stories By Andy Thurai

Andy Thurai is Program Director for API, IoT and Connected Cloud with IBM, where he is responsible for solutionizing, strategizing, evangelizing, and providing thought leadership for those technologies. Prior to this role, he has held technology, architecture leadership and executive positions with Intel, Nortel, BMC, CSC, and L-1 Identity Solutions.

You can find more of his thoughts at www.thurai.net/blog or follow him on Twitter @AndyThurai.

IoT & Smart Cities Stories
"MobiDev is a Ukraine-based software development company. We do mobile development, and we're specialists in that. But we do full stack software development for entrepreneurs, for emerging companies, and for enterprise ventures," explained Alan Winters, U.S. Head of Business Development at MobiDev, in this SYS-CON.tv interview at 20th Cloud Expo, held June 6-8, 2017, at the Javits Center in New York City, NY.
Cloud computing delivers on-demand resources that provide businesses with flexibility and cost-savings. The challenge in moving workloads to the cloud has been the cost and complexity of ensuring the initial and ongoing security and regulatory (PCI, HIPAA, FFIEC) compliance across private and public clouds. Manual security compliance is slow, prone to human error, and represents over 50% of the cost of managing cloud applications. Determining how to automate cloud security compliance is critical...
Enterprises have taken advantage of IoT to achieve important revenue and cost advantages. What is less apparent is how incumbent enterprises operating at scale have, following success with IoT, built analytic, operations management and software development capabilities - ranging from autonomous vehicles to manageable robotics installations. They have embraced these capabilities as if they were Silicon Valley startups.
Recently, REAN Cloud built a digital concierge for a North Carolina hospital that had observed that most patient call button questions were repetitive. In addition, the paper-based process used to measure patient health metrics was laborious, not in real-time and sometimes error-prone. In their session at 21st Cloud Expo, Sean Finnerty, Executive Director, Practice Lead, Health Care & Life Science at REAN Cloud, and Dr. S.P.T. Krishnan, Principal Architect at REAN Cloud, discussed how they built...
When talking IoT we often focus on the devices, the sensors, the hardware itself. The new smart appliances, the new smart or self-driving cars (which are amalgamations of many ‘things'). When we are looking at the world of IoT, we should take a step back, look at the big picture. What value are these devices providing. IoT is not about the devices, its about the data consumed and generated. The devices are tools, mechanisms, conduits. This paper discusses the considerations when dealing with the...
Bill Schmarzo, author of "Big Data: Understanding How Data Powers Big Business" and "Big Data MBA: Driving Business Strategies with Data Science," is responsible for setting the strategy and defining the Big Data service offerings and capabilities for EMC Global Services Big Data Practice. As the CTO for the Big Data Practice, he is responsible for working with organizations to help them identify where and how to start their big data journeys. He's written several white papers, is an avid blogge...
Business professionals no longer wonder if they'll migrate to the cloud; it's now a matter of when. The cloud environment has proved to be a major force in transitioning to an agile business model that enables quick decisions and fast implementation that solidify customer relationships. And when the cloud is combined with the power of cognitive computing, it drives innovation and transformation that achieves astounding competitive advantage.
Machine learning has taken residence at our cities' cores and now we can finally have "smart cities." Cities are a collection of buildings made to provide the structure and safety necessary for people to function, create and survive. Buildings are a pool of ever-changing performance data from large automated systems such as heating and cooling to the people that live and work within them. Through machine learning, buildings can optimize performance, reduce costs, and improve occupant comfort by ...
René Bostic is the Technical VP of the IBM Cloud Unit in North America. Enjoying her career with IBM during the modern millennial technological era, she is an expert in cloud computing, DevOps and emerging cloud technologies such as Blockchain. Her strengths and core competencies include a proven record of accomplishments in consensus building at all levels to assess, plan, and implement enterprise and cloud computing solutions. René is a member of the Society of Women Engineers (SWE) and a m...
JETRO showcased Japan Digital Transformation Pavilion at SYS-CON's 21st International Cloud Expo® at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA. The Japan External Trade Organization (JETRO) is a non-profit organization that provides business support services to companies expanding to Japan. With the support of JETRO's dedicated staff, clients can incorporate their business; receive visa, immigration, and HR support; find dedicated office space; identify local government subsidies; get...