Welcome!

Cloud Security Authors: Elizabeth White, Zakia Bouachraoui, Pat Romanski, Yeshim Deniz, Liz McMillan

Related Topics: @DXWorldExpo, Agile Computing, @CloudExpo, Cloud Security

@DXWorldExpo: Article

Micro-Second Synchronicity | @CloudExpo #Cloud #BigData #IoT #M2M

If we are involved in a cyber-war, where are the frontlines?

Nanokrieg© in Cloud Computing: Battles with Micro-Second Synchronicity

If we are involved in a cyber-war, where are the frontlines? Should we be spending more time (and money) in figuring out cyber-warfare, instead of conventional warfare?

(Part of this article is an excerpt of Carlini's upcoming book, NANOKRIEG: BEYOND BLITZKRIEG)

In the middle of World War II, very basic and primitive computers were designed to improve accuracy for naval gunfire. The first computers ran complex mathematical applications to calculate trajectories and gunfire from large battleships. The size of the computer was huge and was made up of vacuum-tube technology. You could literally walk into the computer. (And needed to, when a tube went bad and you had to replace it.)

Since then, computers shrank in size and costs, but their computing power and applications to various industries grew exponentially with the new minimalization of circuits and integrated chips, as well as efficiencies designed into power applications supporting the computer. Their applications became almost universal in every commercial application possible from:

  • Inventory and industrial process controls
  • To accounting and payment processing
  • To manufacturing, computer-aided design, and shop floor systems
  • To managing all financial transactions and stock exchange server farms

Computers were also used in various weapon and war applications from fire control systems for controlling multiple gun systems aboard ships and airplanes, to guidance systems on rockets and missiles, to strategic game simulation used in analyzing various conflict scenarios with various enemies and terrorist organizations.

Nanokrieg: War Being Won and Lost in Microseconds
As Sun Tzu, the author of The Art of War stated, "Quickness is the essence of the war."

Today, attacks aren't measured in days or even hours. A whole war can last only a couple of seconds - or less. Battlefields are now in server farms and across the network. Some wars could happen and no one would even know about them. Most are not reported - and you can understand why.

No company or financial firm wants to announce their protective measures are inadequate and that all their internal confidential information has been compromised.

We have already seen in multiple instances, where people's credit card and personal information is stolen. Where were the safeguards? Where were the defenses against attacks?

According to IBM, almost one out of four financial institutions (23.8%) is still exposed. Is your money sitting in one of these institutions?

In less than a second, 1000s of pinpoint attacks on different targets can be executed by high-speed transaction processors. Stocks could plummet. Bank accounts could be wiped out - or transferred. Certain controls in power grids and other utilities, like maximum temperature levels or power load levels, could be overridden.

Weapons do not have to be flown into the battle zone or brought in by big transport ships, they are carried in by the network. Trojan horses, worms, viruses, and other destructive malware weapons do not need huge supporting logistics or long timeframes. They can be sent off in a microsecond on an electronic pathway to the "war zone."

Riches and treasures do not need heavy equipment or convoys of trucks to pull them out, they can get taken out on the network as well. Electronic valuables have no physical weight, just virtual value.

There are no frontlines any more, only virtual lines within electronic borders in Nanokrieg.

As I have mentioned in a whitepaper, "The speed of response equals victory, or at least, survival."

EMP: Is Your Data Center Protected?
An Electro-Magnetic Pulse bomb (EMP) was a threat scenario discussed in the Cold War-era. An EMP bomb is not a bomb that is dropped and strikes a target or a city. An EMP bomb could be exploded 100 miles above the earth and its coverage is a much wider area (see image).

With more terrorist organizations around the world and countries like North Korea, this type of threat has been given more credence as to being a real possibility.

The delivery system for an EMP bomb is a lot more imprecise than a guided, intercontinental missile. All it needs to have is a simple rocket that can get it out into space above a country. It does not have-to-have pinpoint accuracy as a missile launched to hit a particular city or facility.

The effects of an EMP bomb is that all unshielded electronics go dead. The generated electronic "pulse" fries all the electronics in computers, cars, data centers, buildings, and anything that is unprotected. Basically, a well-placed EMP bomb can throw a whole region back into the 1700s. No vehicles, no computers, no radio, no TV, nothing electronic functions anymore.

Data centers as well as the power grid should be protected from this type of attack. Building amenities should include the ability to shield tenants' electronics from an EMP attack. The more electronics that are shielded, the less impact an EMP will have on a region.

Some organizations are discussing the effects of an EMP and what it would do to the total economy. They are identifying those rogue nations and terrorist groups that could use a weapon like this.

Some articles are popping up in the mainstream press about EMPs but unfortunately, some reporters have no clue as to what EMPs entail. One such article is in the Washington Post. He talks about the "improbability" of having an EMP bomb because in order for it to be "effective":

It requires a missile that can deliver the bomb to a precise point in the atmosphere.

Precise point? Look at the map. The beauty of the EMP bomb is that you do NOT have to have pinpoint accuracy, you just need to get it over a region.

My advice to the reporter is to stick with what he knows and not delve into infrastructure and electronic warfare issues that he knows nothing about. All you need is to deliver the bomb 100 miles above the earth anywhere over the United States and you will affect a lot of territory. He tries to make it into a "Republican issue," which is total nonsense. This is why most people have turned away from the mainstream media. Facts are not being represented.

North Korea is working on a satellite that will orbit the earth 100 miles away which is the perfect location for an EMP bomb. At this point, this is not science fiction or a theoretical threat, it is cold reality.

EMP bombs are definitely part of the arsenal of Nanokrieg and they are very effective as to knocking out civilization as we know it. EMPs should be viewed as a force equalizer for those countries which do not have all the money and resources to sustain a huge military force. All you need is one well-placed bomb 100 miles or so above us. And well-placed does not equal "accurate." Just look at the map to see the spread.

Carlini's visionary book, LOCATION LOCATION CONNECTIVITY is available on AMAZON.

Follow daily Carlini-isms at www.TWITTER.com/JAMESCARLINI

Copyright 2016 - James Carlini

More Stories By James Carlini

James Carlini, MBA, a certified Infrastructure Consultant, keynote speaker and former award-winning Adjunct Professor at Northwestern University, has advised on mission-critical networks. Clients include the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, GLOBEX, and City of Chicago’s 911 Center. An expert witness in civil and federal courts on network infrastructure, he has worked with AT&T, Sprint and others.

Follow daily Carlini-isms at www.twitter.com/JAMESCARLINI

Comments (0)

Share your thoughts on this story.

Add your comment
You must be signed in to add a comment. Sign-in | Register

In accordance with our Comment Policy, we encourage comments that are on topic, relevant and to-the-point. We will remove comments that include profanity, personal attacks, racial slurs, threats of violence, or other inappropriate material that violates our Terms and Conditions, and will block users who make repeated violations. We ask all readers to expect diversity of opinion and to treat one another with dignity and respect.


IoT & Smart Cities Stories
Dion Hinchcliffe is an internationally recognized digital expert, bestselling book author, frequent keynote speaker, analyst, futurist, and transformation expert based in Washington, DC. He is currently Chief Strategy Officer at the industry-leading digital strategy and online community solutions firm, 7Summits.
Digital Transformation is much more than a buzzword. The radical shift to digital mechanisms for almost every process is evident across all industries and verticals. This is often especially true in financial services, where the legacy environment is many times unable to keep up with the rapidly shifting demands of the consumer. The constant pressure to provide complete, omnichannel delivery of customer-facing solutions to meet both regulatory and customer demands is putting enormous pressure on...
IoT is rapidly becoming mainstream as more and more investments are made into the platforms and technology. As this movement continues to expand and gain momentum it creates a massive wall of noise that can be difficult to sift through. Unfortunately, this inevitably makes IoT less approachable for people to get started with and can hamper efforts to integrate this key technology into your own portfolio. There are so many connected products already in place today with many hundreds more on the h...
The standardization of container runtimes and images has sparked the creation of an almost overwhelming number of new open source projects that build on and otherwise work with these specifications. Of course, there's Kubernetes, which orchestrates and manages collections of containers. It was one of the first and best-known examples of projects that make containers truly useful for production use. However, more recently, the container ecosystem has truly exploded. A service mesh like Istio addr...
Digital Transformation: Preparing Cloud & IoT Security for the Age of Artificial Intelligence. As automation and artificial intelligence (AI) power solution development and delivery, many businesses need to build backend cloud capabilities. Well-poised organizations, marketing smart devices with AI and BlockChain capabilities prepare to refine compliance and regulatory capabilities in 2018. Volumes of health, financial, technical and privacy data, along with tightening compliance requirements by...
Charles Araujo is an industry analyst, internationally recognized authority on the Digital Enterprise and author of The Quantum Age of IT: Why Everything You Know About IT is About to Change. As Principal Analyst with Intellyx, he writes, speaks and advises organizations on how to navigate through this time of disruption. He is also the founder of The Institute for Digital Transformation and a sought after keynote speaker. He has been a regular contributor to both InformationWeek and CIO Insight...
Andrew Keys is Co-Founder of ConsenSys Enterprise. He comes to ConsenSys Enterprise with capital markets, technology and entrepreneurial experience. Previously, he worked for UBS investment bank in equities analysis. Later, he was responsible for the creation and distribution of life settlement products to hedge funds and investment banks. After, he co-founded a revenue cycle management company where he learned about Bitcoin and eventually Ethereal. Andrew's role at ConsenSys Enterprise is a mul...
To Really Work for Enterprises, MultiCloud Adoption Requires Far Better and Inclusive Cloud Monitoring and Cost Management … But How? Overwhelmingly, even as enterprises have adopted cloud computing and are expanding to multi-cloud computing, IT leaders remain concerned about how to monitor, manage and control costs across hybrid and multi-cloud deployments. It’s clear that traditional IT monitoring and management approaches, designed after all for on-premises data centers, are falling short in ...
In his general session at 19th Cloud Expo, Manish Dixit, VP of Product and Engineering at Dice, discussed how Dice leverages data insights and tools to help both tech professionals and recruiters better understand how skills relate to each other and which skills are in high demand using interactive visualizations and salary indicator tools to maximize earning potential. Manish Dixit is VP of Product and Engineering at Dice. As the leader of the Product, Engineering and Data Sciences team at D...
Dynatrace is an application performance management software company with products for the information technology departments and digital business owners of medium and large businesses. Building the Future of Monitoring with Artificial Intelligence. Today we can collect lots and lots of performance data. We build beautiful dashboards and even have fancy query languages to access and transform the data. Still performance data is a secret language only a couple of people understand. The more busine...